Couture has never been one to follow the masses let alone trends. They reject the ready-to-wear to take heavyweight details and Romanticism for tea.


I love couture like the next person for it’s idealistic nature and absolute unattainability. While I found initial fascination in moodier aesthetics of Alexander McQueen and the influence from popstars that recently performed at the Half-time of Super Bowlthe closest American football will ever make sense to me –  Guopei was the only person who made me tingle down to my toes with hand detailed embroidery and spectacular settings she chooses to present her collections in.

For someone who is the person that effortlessly blends how the east really meets the west with the true imagination of what fashion can be, there was a noticeable absence and pivot in design from the east other than her trademark silk details that she stayed true to in her recent collection “Legends”.

Even though it probably did make you go, “Oh spring’s here” and “where-are-my-asian-sisters-at-but-holy-mother-of-God-cover-me-in-gold”; it did make you sit up more for haute couture right? Trend or no trend, Guopei has become a league of her own. Heading her first bespoke collection for SS17 during Paris couture week with dramatic lighting somehow served to reflect the dark moody tones of European history where she seeks to emphasise and chronicle the beauty of Fashion and cultural influences through the ages for the 21st Century. Think Queen Victoria if she hung out with The Enchantress, and Monica Geller experiencing humidity. The ornate crown headpieces that hint at Mary, Queen of Scots, or the reimagined Kokoshnik from the Russian princesses of the past. Guopei talks as if to a lover of all things spiritual and faith with her aesthetic symbols of the mysteries in faiths and medieval warriors on the runway.
And you can tell – this woman serves as a living testimony who successfully modernised traditional couture practices and reminded us of our complex dynamics on a global scale at the same time.

She flourishes her love for Romance found in 90’s medieval films with floor length translucent sleeves and contrasts her thoughts of a woman’s body in an unorthodox caged ball gown that show some leg. It was only with the accompanying makeup that made me reflect about the art of fashion – about it’s lack of wearability and obligation to opulence. This very element was something that I have greatly missed what with the increasingly breakneck speed that fast fashion has been hurrying with, leaving couture in it’s wake. Couture has never been one to follow the masses let alone trends. They reject the ready-to-wear to take heavyweight details and Romanticism for tea.