Escapism is not some throwaway word that any young ‘un living in today’s society can spout in Poppy’s world, but the very personification of Poppy herself.


It was the May of 2016 Sydney Fashion Week when I spied with my little eye and 24mm camera lens. A work of art that Michelangelo and Andy Warhol had blessed. Faux leather, reinassance flowers and all. It was awash with primary colors of yellow and red amongst a sea of cool whites and blacks. Offbeat, riveting and completely unconventional that made you consider eating only wonderbread for the next month or so; Poppy Lissiman stepped up centre stage bearing matching colors with her hawaiian dad shirt and jeans, and it was from then on I knew that we were meant to be together even after spending almost an entire year apart post Thanksgiving (a handy time indicator reminding us of how long ago High School Musical wrapped up and how Zac Efron – hubba hubba – had doubled in size and muscle since).

But look, even with the new generation of designers storming onto the scene, Australia never really had that history of being ground zero for fashion before this to look back on. We left it to Europe to create history and innovate by dramatising the artistic side of fashion (with Japan giving them a little heads up). We gave America free reign to dictate how models should look and showcase their personalities on the runways – thrown kisses and winks all the way until the next Victoria Secret’s showcase and well, Kate Moss – even though we do have our moments in the spotlight by doing what we do best. The tasteful blend of cultures, opinions usually accompanied with a healthy dose of Rosé (hello Emma Mulholland!). We do love a good Australian story to justify a price tag, and we champion subjects almost a little too positively and hold anything coming from our side of the globe like a long sought after Tony award or the latest iPhone.

So meet Poppy. She’s the swirly bright colors of neon pop borrowing remnants of 70’s bandwagon youths clawing for a way to escape into the imaginations of a infinite world of curious possibilities. Poppy relates to these youths as if their aesthetic goals were designed to fit an Abercrombie ad, and preserved their history with an old-age Hollywood glamor from the Nicole Kidmans and Idina Menzels of the world.

Escapism is not some throwaway word that any young ‘un living in today’s society can spout in Poppy’s world, but the very personification of Poppy herself.