If designers still had their way, we would be getting married in Chanel and tearing up the dance floor in Balmain.


The attempt to make fashion relevant tends to contradicts itself. Luxury brands were built and sustained over time in the hierarchal realms of fashion by which it’s failure to connect with us, the people who negotiate supply and demand! If designers still had their way, we would be getting married in Chanel and tearing up the dance floor in Balmain. But then this thing I can only describe as “high street” happened. Inspired by some of our favourite items with neverending zeroes on the clothing tag, items that we’ve drooled over social media at a much lower compensation rate to the chagrin of the former; even though we’ve occasionally taken Rousseau’s hostile stance towards excess luxury, our hypocritically resentful selves gobbled up these consolation prizes like a knee-jerk reflex.

Yeah-nah. It gets tiring denying the fact that we’ll still love acquiring stuff all the same.

As an adopted Aussie, you can find a cool jacket or two on the internet across the sea from our American counterparts where only the abysmal delivery prices per package costs as much as my monthly budget for coffee – assuming that a brand new wardrobe is to be expected every season to cover every day of the year. After learning over time that cost has absolutely no correlation to quality, utility and most of all, ease of clothing care, suddenly branding doesn’t sit as high in my Maslow hierarchy of fashion. Which is enough to give up shopping altogether just at the thought of it. Huge fashion houses selling almost in bulk without so much as a click of their pearl heels, and blossoming labels hitting that sweet spot of anything below a triple digit price tag. It can be difficult (and a little daunting) for everything in between those two variations to blue ocean competitors in such a heavily dynamic industry.

And it’s not just because I’m Asian.

So invest in some good pieces where the concept of affordability should sit on a comfortable range for you. Then reduce, reuse and recycle.
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Styling and Photography// NICOLE FANG
shot on Canon 6D with 24-105mm lens